CogSci 2018 Poster Design Contest for $100

Would you like to see your artwork displayed across the nation and the globe? Support a prestigious international scientific conference? Have a chance to win a cash prize of $100? If so, please submit your poster design for CogSci 2018 by June 12th!

The Cognitive Science Society is the world’s largest academic society focusing on how the mind works. In 2018 the CogSci annual meeting will be held in Madison, and we are seeking original artwork to advertise the conference. The conference title is ‘Changing Minds’ a focus that brings together disciplines such as cognitive psychology, machine learning, education, development, and neuroscience. Themes for the conference include:

changing minds: connecting human and machine learning
changing brains: neural mechanisms of cognitive change
changing knowledge: cognition, education, and technology
changing society: cognition, persuasion, and politics

We would like a poster that captures these themes with a compelling graphic, together with text providing further details about the event.

Here are examples from previous conferences:

cogsciposter_2011_smallercogsci_2012CogSci2015cogsci_2015_poster-small2cogsci_2016CogSci2017-Poster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For the poster text use llorum ipsum or dummy text to demonstrate font and color you recommend to work with your design elements. Please send PDF files to ceiverson@wisc.edu.

The competition due date is June 12. A shortlist will be determined via crowd-sourced adaptive sampling using the NEXT system, and the conference committee will select a winner by June 15.

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